Business Doesn't Have Feelings

You wake up one day and find yourself managing people, overseeing HR, making the almighty payroll and responsible for a lot more taxes, I mean, you're a business owner. It could be a family business, you could have secured funding, bootstrapped or just decided to open an LLC for the hell of it. Regardless, one thing is true - business doesn't have feelings.

If you are a business owner that has even considered that a team member could be holding you back, that you needed to add more people, whatever the case may be AND you did not move forward because of how others might "feel", then I don't believe you're going to make it in the future of business. Whether we like it or not, there is a balance of humanity and business in every transaction and interaction. I see a lot of owners that are on each side of the scale but not well balance. Meaning, (a) they let their team run over them and take advantage of them, because they're too close and putting the business second and then (b) those that have little human qualities while at work, they're cold, very little respect for others and are relentless about all things business.

If a business is establishing a culture, improving a long-lasting one or just trying to figure it all out, as leaders, we must consistently practice having a well balance approach to running our business and meeting our teams needs. Remember, business has no feelings, so what's introduced and maintained must come from the leadership. We can't be successful without team members and they needed to be treated "right". And we can't pay those team members, grow and be able to provide more for our team as their and our needs grow every year, without paying serious attention to the numbers and actually managing the business. Having a clear open dialogue with your team about the company goals and where we're all headed together is vital.

Openly post your short and long term goals in your office or consistency on your video chats with your team. People remember repetition, period. The missing piece in this process, in my experience, is the leader. Once the leader is convinced this is where we're going and how we're getting there - then it's easy to clearly communicate that direction. We would all like to think that everyone on our team wants 100% of what we want; this is simply not true. Ask your team the difficult questions to make sure you are being the leader he/she truly needs to achieve their goals. 

Here's a few questions to get you started in your next one on one meeting with your team member:

---> What are the top 3 things that bring you the most happiness?

---> How much money do you need to make to be happy in this line of work? Why that amount?

---> Where do you see yourself 36 months from today?

---> What were a few of your career challenges this past year? How can we overcome those next year?

---> What are your short term and long goals this year, in this position?

Now, write those answers down, dedicate time on a monthly basis to knowing and understanding each person on your team. If your team is too big, then make sure this trickles down to all departments. Clearly communicate the vision of the company to your team, repeat in your meetings, show consistency highs / lows and stop letting certain people take advantage of you just being a good person. Remember, business doesn't have feelings, you do & you're responsible keeping that business running.

You can do it.

Business Doesn't Have Feelings

You wake up one day and find yourself managing people, overseeing HR, making the almighty payroll and responsible for a lot more taxes, I mean, you're a business owner. It could be a family business, you could have secured funding, bootstrapped or just decided to open an LLC for the hell of it. Regardless, one thing is true - business doesn't have feelings.

If you are a business owner that has even considered that a team member could be holding you back, that you needed to add more people, whatever the case may be AND you did not move forward because of how others might "feel", then I don't believe you're going to make it in the future of business. Whether we like it or not, there is a balance of humanity and business in every transaction and interaction. I see a lot of owners that are on each side of the scale but not well balance. Meaning, (a) they let their team run over them and take advantage of them, because they're too close and putting the business second and then (b) those that have little human qualities while at work, they're cold, very little respect for others and are relentless about all things business.

If a business is establishing a culture, improving a long-lasting one or just trying to figure it all out, as leaders, we must consistently practice having a well balance approach to running our business and meeting our teams needs. Remember, business has no feelings, so what's introduced and maintained must come from the leadership. We can't be successful without team members and they needed to be treated "right". And we can't pay those team members, grow and be able to provide more for our team as their and our needs grow every year, without paying serious attention to the numbers and actually managing the business. Having a clear open dialogue with your team about the company goals and where we're all headed together is vital.

Openly post your short and long term goals in your office or consistency on your video chats with your team. People remember repetition, period. The missing piece in this process, in my experience, is the leader. Once the leader is convinced this is where we're going and how we're getting there - then it's easy to clearly communicate that direction. We would all like to think that everyone on our team wants 100% of what we want; this is simply not true. Ask your team the difficult questions to make sure you are being the leader he/she truly needs to achieve their goals. 

Here's a few questions to get you started in your next one on one meeting with your team member:

---> What are the top 3 things that bring you the most happiness?

---> How much money do you need to make to be happy in this line of work? Why that amount?

---> Where do you see yourself 36 months from today?

---> What were a few of your career challenges this past year? How can we overcome those next year?

---> What are your short term and long goals this year, in this position?

Now, write those answers down, dedicate time on a monthly basis to knowing and understanding each person on your team. If your team is too big, then make sure this trickles down to all departments. Clearly communicate the vision of the company to your team, repeat in your meetings, show consistency highs / lows and stop letting certain people take advantage of you just being a good person. Remember, business doesn't have feelings, you do & you're responsible keeping that business running.

You can do it.